Wednesday, 20 May 2020

Diary pages for 2020



Friday 31st July 2020

Found yet another of the large dark stemmed specimens and I wonder just what it means!

Todays specimen was found approx 30 yards from the trio I found a couple of days ago, and some 50 yards from the early dark stemmed (with flowers) and some 100 yards from the very first which is caged and we still dont have any flowers.

I noticed with this new one found today and photographed here that the leaves and the bracts are without doubt slightly darker, than the classic plant you see on the right of the photo. 



And here now are some more photos which clearly show the darker stem.  The stem appears to be a mid brown to a dark green in colour, you can in places see the bleeding through of a light green typical helleborine colour.








All the Brown stemmed helleborines as of 31st July 2020


Helleborine SW4

Helleborine SW4 "In Gryke"
31st July 2020



Purpurea SW 5

Purpurea SW5 on 31st July 2020


Purpurea SW5 on 31st July 2020


SW7 "Dark Tones"


Epipactis helleborine SW7 (Dark Tones)
Photo: 31st July 2020

Epipactis helleborine SW7 (Dark Tones)
Photo: 31st July 2020


Epipactis helleborine SW7 (Dark Tones)
Photo: 31st July 2020


Epipactis helleborine SW7 (Dark Tones)
Photo: 31st July 2020



Thursday 30th July 2020

SW Helleborine 8
(Heart to Heart)


E. Helleborine (SW8)
"Heart to Heart"
30th July 2020 


E. Helleborine (SW8)
"Heart to Heart"

30th July 2020 

SW Helleborine 4b
(Chlorantha)



SW Helleborine Chlorantha 4b
30th July 2020

Wednesday 29th July 2020

Another day searching for helleborines and managed to locate a further 72 specimens which most were in canopy which included some really good hi vigour plants. Some reached almost a metre, with lots at intermediate heights. Up to 4 Clorantha specimens and one or two of the more dense canopy specimens showing signs of purpurea as one would expect.

One plant had obviously come through much variagated but sadly the inflorescence had already been bitten off. 

Whilst surveying these slightly lower areas on the SW slopes of Hutton Roof for helleborines I have now amassed in total so far a additional 105 helleborines, and 32 atrorubens, which now brings this years total so far to 208 helleborines and 650 atrorubens. 

Photos to follow soon....

Tuesday 28th July 2020

Today I wanted to check on 70c, the one with the dark stem, well it looks better having now straightened out but still no signs of flower, expected one week or so. But the afternoon got very interesting indeed.  I decided to check out a area which is some 50 metre or so to the South/South west of my regular area and had some lovely surprises.

I managed to find a further 27 E.helleborines, and a further 26 E. atrorubens, some of the atrorubens had been taken down by roe deer, but some of the helleborines were stunning.

One particular hotspot produced no less than 16 helleborines with lots of variance. Some showed a variagation, also had a very pallid form which was not far of chlorantha, but perhaps the most striking was a twinned plant with one of the inflorescence missing, but all OK on the other, the stem, ovaries which were a medium brown and pedicals seemed to be more purplish which is so unusual itself on a helleborine, and there were parts of the stem were I could see a light green bleeding through, it was a beautiful specimen with just some of its bottom flowers open and here are the best photos:

Helleborine SW2



Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020

Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020


Helleborine SW2
on 28th July 2020

SW Helleborine 3

and now moving on to another beauty found today which shows variagated in petals, ovaries etc, but also it shows less in other nearby specimens.


SW Helleborine 3
28th July 2020

SW Helleborine 3
28th July 2020


SW Helleborine 3
28th July 2020


SW Helleborine 3
28th July 2020

SW Helleborine 4 (chlorantha)

Here is another little beauty I found today in the same little area as the two already
 mentioned above. This was a really light specimen and for me it could represent a (nearly) chlorantha


SW Helleborine 4 (chlorantha)
28th July 2020

SW Helleborine 4 (chlorantha)
28th July 2020


Now then close to were we had the mid brown stem, we have another about 4 metres away, but this time a dark green to mid green stem on another helleborine (very unusual around HR)

SW Helleborine 7 (dark green stem)







Below we have another pair with both E. Helleborine and E. Atrorubens within 6" of one another.


Atrorubens - Helleborine - Helleborine on 28th July 2020

South West Helleborine 1

(Below) SW Helleborine 1 beauty which was hi-vigour and approx one metre


South West Helleborine 1
on 28th July 2020 

South West Helleborine 1
on 28th July 2020 

South West Helleborine 1

on 28th July 2020 

Friday 24th July 2020
9q
(Below) the area of the 9s population shows much swarming towards the light green stemmed specimens (perhaps 10/12) and this is 9q which currently is laden with black aphids



33o
(below) shows 33o which sort of hides against the hazel to the left hand side of 33 twins (33a,33b). quite late in flowering

33o on 24th July 2020


Saturday 18th July 2020

Decided to check out two pavements on the Hutton Roof side I previously used to work, the pavement I nicknamed at the time "Hybrid Hill" and the opposite pavement which I called "Ingleborough View".  

On Ingleborough View, I noticed the atrorubens numbers were about what I would have expected with probably about 50 in total, but the helleborines were well down with perhaps 50% of what we used to see. The only hybrid we had on this pavement was not there. 

On Hybrid Hill, the area which was the first area I used to study atrorubens on a more regular basis, which had back in 2012 up to 5 high vigour hybrids (schmalhauseneii) and lots of really good high vigour helleborines.  I searched all the regular spots and found the atrorubens were well down in numbers but more disapointed to find no hybrids at all, and again no hi-vigour helleborines, the odd ones I did manage to find were certainly of medium build. 

Again I can only put this down to the changing climate over the past 3 years which seems to be creating havoc with most of the high vigour plants. It is so bad now that if anyone was to ask to see a high vigour hybrid, I may if lucky find just a couple of specimens throughout.  We always used to have between 20 to 30 hybrids on Hutton Roof.  

Friday 17th July 2020

17a2


Just could not resist another of this beauty
on 17th July 2020

Our new Pallens 3a on 17th July 2020
also shows how close to Pallens 3

Wednesday 15th July 2020
Escarp Pallens 3a





Atrorubens and Helleborine so close
15th July 2020


Wasp pollinating one of the 80s population of atrorubens
15th July 2020


Escarp 8d


Atrorubens with heavy 40 plus flower yield which go all four sides of inflorescence.
Photo: 15th July 2020



Tuesday 14th July 2020

17a1

17a1 atrorubens on 14th July 2020


70

 specimen 70
on 14th July 2020

 specimen 70
on 14th July 2020

80s population

A bicolor variety in the midst of classic atrorubens
Hutton Roof on 14th July 2020

A bicolor variety in the midst of classic atrorubens
Hutton Roof on 14th July 2020

17a2



Sunday 12th July 2020

Over the past two/three years I have been getting these low-vigour plants which are light green in their stems and wonder if they hold introgression between atrorubens and helleborine.  Note in most cases they are weak and flimsy and quite a lot of them are deformed within their stems. I wonder if it is possible that they are F2 eg: hybrid breeding back with one of the parents, and this could account for all this weakness you generally find with them?



Been out searching today for this little beauty (photo below) I was kindly put on to by David IA Nattrass and did eventually find it, although my photos have not turned out just as I would have liked but for now here goes:



It as been found on another part of Hutton Roof to which I rarely work, just occasionally which is approx 1/2 mile to the SE away, we have this one (above)

(Below) is our well established 70c




This is 70c (directly above) which comes up everyear (for at least 4 years), but never managed to see the flower so this year it is really well protected. I really do not know what to make of it until it flowers. 
Although presumptious It seems to show at least 3 atroruben attributes such has the very dark stem, hirsurtem stem, and leaves profiled distichous to the stem. YET it also shows helleborine attributes as well eg: The general profiling look is helleborine, the large leaves are helleborine, the time of flowering is helleborine

Never did I ever think we would have another on Hutton Roof, but here we have it, and it also opens the doors for others. I am quite used to seeing schmalhauseneii (hybrid) orchids from the past, but this is something really special.  Can't wait for the flowering......

Saturday 11th July 2020

Finished off my numbers survey today of the flowers purely within my study area.  Area approx 500 yards x 200 yards

Total completed numbers after surveying study area are:

(11th July 2020) Atrorubens now at: 618 with 138 predated
Helleborine now at 103 with 25 predated

Possible introgression recognised in: 32

also some historic records include:

(2019) Helleborine 114 with 18 predated

( 27th July 2017) Atrorubens 650-800
Helleborine 136 with 48 predated

9g


9g very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020

9g very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020

9g very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020



Low Pavement 2


E. Atrorubens
on Hutton Roof 11th July 2020

I found a cracking possible hybrid today which met at least 3 requirements, just nice to get one now and again with a dark (atrorubens stem), One of the rare times you get a plant with flowers bunched and going all around the stem, also the leaves spiralling up the stem, and the only atroruben type flower led plant amongst a nearby (within 3 metres) seven Helleborines of which 3 were large vigour. 


Epipactis schmalhauseneii (named Low Pavement 1)
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (named Low Pavement 1)
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (named Low Pavement 1)
Hutton Roof on 11th July 2020


First flowering helleborines today included


First of the year flowering helleborine on Hutton Roof
Photo: 11th July 2020


First of the year flowering helleborine on Hutton Roof
Photo: 11th July 2020

First of the year flowering helleborine on Hutton Roof
Photo: 11th July 2020


 First of the year flowering helleborine on Hutton Roof
Photo: 11th July 2020

Escarp West 90d







Friday 10th July 2020

Found a new small Lutescens within one metre of the nominal size specimen on escarp 8

Thursday 9th July 2020


38a
Below - 38a is a lovely mid-red similar to the surrounding specimens (3) Photo taken on 9th July 2020


38a atrorubens
Hutton Roof 9th July 2020


Wednesday 8th July 2020

 Escarp 18b and 18c twinned, now taken down by Roe Deer.
Surveyed the North West section of my study area and noticed we have lost lots of E. helleborine, a few with predation, thats about normal which you do expect, but most I guess the loss has been through climate change bringing about the hot continual weather and producing drought weather patterns just at the crucial times. It all seemed to start from the dreadful 2018 season, but has continued to some degree in 2019 and again in 2020, resulting in so much change in the local evolution, which hopefully may correct itself in the forthcoming years.  The helleborines that have made it OK are generally only of medium to small build (4" to 18"), with many showing signs of premature stunt growth, some with nothing in the inflorescence, and where we always had up to a score of high vigour plants which you do expect with helleborine, we will be lucky if I find 2 this year.  

The exact similar position to whats happened with the helleborines has shown itself also within the hi-vigour hybrids, which started to deplete from 3 years ago and now we are lucky if we have any more than 5, yet interesting the plants now considered to be of low-vigour hybrids has increased tremendously, so whether this means we will get plenty of high vigours in the next decade remains to be seen. 

55y


This must be "twist and shout"
Atrorubens 55y on 8th July 2020

55x
(Below) photo taken 8th July 2020



33j

(Below) is 33j. very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine 



Escarp West 95a



Escarp West 95



55w



Monday 6th July 2020

Escarp 7



55a1

55 population

Shows multiple variants within short distance of one another




17b



55p




70c
Showing photo taken on 4th July, and below is photo showing from 6th July 2020. I have managed to get one of the better cages to try and protect this specimen. Also did manage a shot or two of the leaf which does show the E. helleborine profile. 







55



66
(Below) 66 is so special, whos ancestor is preserved within the records of KEW (Accession K000342484). Note bicolor and YET on a light green stem!




55a




30a and b
These (below) are a beautiful duo which are within the range of eleven helleborines of which two helleborines are only 3ft away, you can see one of them in this photo.


30a and b atrorubens which are placed directly in the middle of 11 E. helleborines

Saturday 4th July 2020

80d

9a or Pallens 2



9o



17a
(Below) Always been a interesting plant
the two left photos were taken yesterday but the two to the right (taken in 2019) shows the plant with leaf compression and also note the change in stem appearance going from hairy to smooth in the right hand photo. I also have the photo from 2018 when I can find it.  It purely comes through has leaf compression with stem and no flowers. 



70c

(Below) 70c has been established in this profile to my knowledge at least 5 years. I visit it everyear and in all circumstances it usually its inflorescence falls victim to browsing before any flowers get chance to show. I would love to get some feedback on this eg: what do you think this is and why?



17x



17d (pmg)



55a



Thursday 2nd July 2020

Escarp West 93


Epipactis atrorubens Escarp West 93
2nd July 2020

Escarp West 92


Epipactis atrorubens bicolor specimen Escarp W 92
Hutton Roof - 2nd July 2020

Escarp 18b and 18c


Escarp 18b and 18c on 2nd July 2020

Escarp 18a


Escarp 18a - atroruben
Photo: Hutton Roof 2nd July 2020

Escarp 18a - atroruben
Photo: Hutton Roof 2nd July 2020

Escarp 18a - atroruben
Photo: Hutton Roof 2nd July 2020

Escarp 18a - atroruben
Photo: Hutton Roof 2nd July 2020

Escarp 7b

(Below) 7b , a very interesting plant and from a interesting area which does have plenty of helleborines and probable introgression close to hand. 


Escarp 7b
Hutton Roof - 2nd July 2020

Escarp 7a


Escarp 7a atrorubens
Hutton Roof on 2nd July 2020

55m
55n very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine 
Hutton Roof on 2nd July 2020

55v
(Below) 55v is a beauty and comes out from the Juniper close to all the other 55s. This plant does have wide and fluffy bosses almost filling up the epichile


Epipactis atrorubens
Photo: Hutton Roof 2nd July 2020

Escarp 8a




Pallens 3 (Escarp 8)

(Below) is our old Pallens 3 returned after two years absent. 


Escarp 8 or Pallens 3 
2nd July 2020

55u
(Below) very light green stemmed atroruben - bicolor with possible introgression from E. Helleborine. 


very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine also shows bicolor flowers
Hutton Roof on 2nd July 2020



Tuesday 30th June 2020

Where do I start?  Lots of nice orchids have been taken down with Brown Hares at both sides of the pavements, never noticed any problem this year with deer, although I know they are never far away, because I can hear them barking every now and again, but this year its nearly all down to Brown Hare predation. Nothing like past years, this year they are just going for everything! I have noted that they seem to have a preference for atrorubens over helleborine and in 90% of cases it will be atrorubens whilst leaving nearby helleborines. 

Some of the plants are already showing signs of going over and I reckon the best is with us right now and maybe it will be OK for another week or so with others and then thats it.

One thing I am really happy about is that we have got lots of low vigour type (or small stature) "Light Green" stemmed plants which I would say show possible signs of introgression from helleborines, although the light green stems is the only clue you get! in the majority of cases. 

Here now are some of todays (30th June 2020) specials.....

Escarp West brown 91a
(Below) is a very interesting population and there are several in a small cluster that show this beautiful brown on the sepals. This is not unknown to me I also have others on the far side of the pavement probably some 500 yards to the SE.

Unusual. 



Escarp West brown 91
(Below) is a very interesting population and there are several in a small cluster that show this beautiful brown on the sepals. This is not unknown to me I also have others on the far side of the pavement probably some 500 yards to the SE.
Unusual. 







Escarp 18b and 18c (duo)
(Below) a lovely duo thought very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine 


Escarp 18b and 18c (duo)
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

Escarp 8a

Escarp 8a atrorubens bicolor
Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

Escarp 18a

(Below) a lovely tall classic atroruben, showing purple sepal and pink/yellow petal


Atrorubens Escarp 18a
Photo: 30th June 2020


Atrorubens Escarp 18a
Photo: 30th June 2020

Atrorubens Escarp 18a
Photo: 30th June 2020

Atrorubens Escarp 18a
Photo: 30th June 2020

41

(Below) a lovely hybrid has fallen victim to Brown Hare - note the "angled chop"



Another low-vigour hybrid (from 55s)

Below is another probable low-vigour very light green stemmed atroruben with possible introgression from E. Helleborine shielded with the rare Rigid Buckler Fern, showing a plant which is very bent over etc.  This sort of tangled and deformed profile is seen regular especially amongst these light green specimens. It sometimes makes me wonder if perhaps they are F2 



(Below) from 55 populations



From 55s population 

55s


55s atrorubens - bicolor
Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

55r


55r Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

55q


Atrorubens 55q with white epichile and bosses
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

37a

(Below) is 37a a lovely classic atrorubens. You meet him when I gain entry to the pavement. A tall plant. Photo taken 30th June 2020


Atrorubens
Photo: 30th June 2020


Atrorubens - bicolor 
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

33k


Atrorubens
Photo: Hutton Roof 30th June 2020

33j


33k 
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020

55


55 atrorubens - bicolor 
Photo: Hutton Roof on 30th June 2020


55o


55o Atrorubens - bicolor with light epichile and bosses
Photo: 30th June 2020 - Hutton Roof.


55o Atrorubens - bicolor with light epichile and bosses
Photo: 30th June 2020 - Hutton Roof.


55o Atrorubens - bicolor with light epichile and bosses
Photo: 30th June 2020 - Hutton Roof.

Friday 26th June 2020

Its becoming familiar that we have lost lots of our tall vigourous E. helleborines, along with NOW most of our tall vigourous hybrids. Thankfully we still have numerous intermediate and smaller suspects and classics which are doing OK. But years of local evolution has been wrecked (at least temporarily) because of drought weather we experienced from both 2018 and again to a lesser extent earlier this year 2020.

I am fairly confident that the reasons we are suffering these great losses is in the majority of cases down to the weather patterns. Too hot and shortages of water at the wrong times!


Eg: the worst of the weather was back in 2018 with a drought leading up to the orchids showing. May in particular and again when the orchids came through in June, most of them were showing signs of dehydration with either showing signs of burn, or being stunted and a lot of them kept their bent over inflorescence and stems and never straightened which in turn just withered away and caused by water starvation resulting in premature dieback.


This 2018 situation has never really left us and we are still paying for it and the orchids are still suffering from the consequences. It caused quite a lot of plants to go into a stunted situation during both 2019 and again this year 2020. Beside the stunted situation lots have just given up the ghost for now! this includes the majority of our prime hybrid specimens. Some plants which were normally seen at about 2ft and greater and now coming through at only 12" or similar.


And this year 2020, the plants are suffering yet again with the added problem of no water during the months of April and May when their need was at its most, so again this situation and in some cases combined with the 2018 historic problems are still with us.


Our Pallens (light forms) are also suffering this year with what I can only guess is of similar to what I have already mentioned above. Several have not even come through this year.


Now then thats enough I want to show you the nice things! and here we are from this morning.....

Well here is Pallens 4 today, 4a stopped at seedling stage, 5 never shown and 5a stopped at seedling stage (so thats 3 down already this year, so I must nurture this one well! Out of the four this one is the only well established of them all and perhaps that as something to do with its survival.

It was also noticed today that during the past 48 hours 40b has succumb to Brown Hare actually taken of the inflorescence through the cage, but 40a is still OK on 26th June 2020. These wide mesh cages are no good against hares they have got used to them so all can be used but now need to re-inforce around the structure with chicken wire.

Noticed E. helleborine "Chlorantha" is coming through OK this year.

41a



30



Escarp 90a
(Below) Well excited about finding this one today. A beautiful bicolor with lots more of its family to follow on over the coming days.






Pallens 4
(Below) is Pallens 4 which has been established
 at least four years


Atrorubens - Var Pallens
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


Atrorubens - Var Pallens
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


 Atrorubens - Var Pallens
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


33
33 has always been a beauty, a bicolor with a lovely white/cream epichile, with a little showing of apple green.



Specimen 33 - bicolor with white epichile
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


Specimen 33 - bicolor with white epichile
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


Specimen 33 - bicolor with white epichile
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


Specimen 33 - bicolor with white epichile
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020

55c


The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020

The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020


The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020

The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020

The beautiful 55c atrorubens bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 26th June 2020

Wednesday 24th June 2020



33
(Below) is a bicolor 33 which always comes through with a very light epichile and light bosses


41a
(Below) is a little beauty which is almost alongside the 41. Found as new today



75



Monday 22nd June 2020

33i

(Below) Starting off today with this little beauty which is new this year. 


33i - 
22nd June 2020 - Hutton Roof


33i - 
22nd June 2020 - Hutton Roof

33c

33C - Bicolor
23rd June 2020 - Hutton Roof

33a and 33b 
(Below) is 33a and 33b which come through as a Duo and bicolor


33a bicolor
23rd June 2020 - Hutton Roof


33a and 33b duo - bicolor
23rd June 2020 - Hutton Roof

55N
55n - Bicolor
22nd June 2020


55n bicolor
23rd June 2020 - Hutton Roof

41 (variagated area)

(Below) is 41 a new plant this year 2020. It is very close within 3ft to the old "variagated" and in close proximity to both E.helleborine and E.atrorubens. 15" 25 flowers/buds - Photo taken on 22nd June 2020


41 on 22nd June 2020


41 on 22nd June 2020


40c (below)


40c on 22nd June 2020

40c on 22nd June 2020

15f
(Below) 15f is a beauty just starting to come through, it has been there for many years but normally gets predated before you see it's splendour.  Photo taken 22nd June 2020.


15L thought to be a hybrid

15L 

Escarp 17 (below)




Escarp 18
(Below) this is a beauty which is a bicolor specimen. 





Escarp West No.1
(Below) Another beauty to get ready for, strong light green stem indicating possible introgression



17L
(Below) is a long established plant, although this year it bears very few flowers. Always has a strong hyperchromic look to it





17W - bicolor






From the 70s population

(Below) Now this is what I sometimes dont like about Mr. Brown Hare, were he snips and leaves part of the stem and the inflorescence dangling... 



From the 9s population

(Below) this looks very interesting and comes from the 9s population which has so many specimens with introgression.  Here is a example of a stem which shows two colours eg: a classic atrorubens purple, yet there is introgression of probable helleborine showing its light green stem


9m
This is one I found a few days ago and probably at it's very best. Photo taken on 22nd June 2020.





60
(Below) this is a new finding this year although I'll bet its been around for sometime. Its certainly a beauty with that brownish general look to it. 


Specimen 60


Specimen 60

Found this beauty today, very browny colour and lies about 16ft from "Split"


Friday 19th June 2020

(Below) The first up today was 33C which is a bicolor from the
33 population, in fact it is about 4ft to the SE of 33.
The epichile is pink, so totally different to 33 which is white.


Above is Specimen 33C Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


Above is Specimen 33C Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020

Above is Specimen 33C Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


(below) Next up was a beauty I have just found and within 10ft N of 55, and this one is coming up through some established Juniper, the specimen takes on the slot of 55n (bicolor)

55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020

 55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020

55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


55n Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020


Below is the updates on 40b (bicolor)


Atrorubens specimen 40b bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 


Atrorubens specimen 40b bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 


Atrorubens specimen 40b bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 



Below is Escarp 17 Atrorubens bicolor


Escarp 17 Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 


Escarp 17 Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 

Escarp 17 Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 

Below: Now for a update on 9M


Epipactis atrorubens 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof 19th June 2020



 Epipactis atrorubens 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof 19th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof 19th June 2020

Epipactis atrorubens 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof 19th June 2020

Epipactis atrorubens 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof 19th June 2020

And Now for 71


Epipactis atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 


Epipactis atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: Hutton Roof on 19th June 2020 

Wednesday 17th June 2020

Lovely to find out that specimen 74 is finally starting to show, it is normally one of the last to flower, but this past two previous years it has been struggling with the dry weather and showed stunted and premature die-back, so hopefully this year it will be OK. Since late June the plant has now fallen victim to Brown Hare with inflorescence removed. 

__________________________



(above) 40b on 17th June 2020 

40b on 17th June 2020 


40b on 17th June 2020 

Above is 40b which for me is spectacular and always the first opener. In its make up eg: cream epichile with a touch of apple green on the midrib. 


Epipactis atrorubens specimen 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof on 17th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens specimen 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof on 17th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens specimen 9M
Photo: Hutton Roof on 17th June 2020


Specimen 17K1 and 17K2 (hybrid)

Victim of Brown Hare sometime around the 15th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens  11c

This is a interesting plant and although 200 yards away does have very strong resemblance in many ways to the 11s population. I show here the plant amongst three classic atrorubens.




This one above now named 33J is a new one just coming through this year, it lies about 6ft to the NW of 33 . Again this population 33 is forever throwing up the beautiful small light green plants. This so far makes about 6 of them over the past two years in the 33 area. 

Monday 15th June 2020

"Some nice "Pallid experiences"


No.40b Atrorubens bicolor -  a light flowering plant with a white epichile with that apple green, always 7-10 days earlier than others
Photo: Hutton Roof on 15th June 2020.


No.40b a light flowering plant, always 7-10 days earlier than others
Photo: Hutton Roof on 15th June 2020.

Above: Specimen 40b (bicolor) is the very first to flower as usual, it's always about 7 days previous to other early specimens. It's a light looking inflorescence showing some bicolor influence with the part yellow petals together with a white/cream and apple green stained epichile whilst retaining a classic light red bosses.

Started checking the 33s and I was happy to find the new  33i is doing OK (see photo below).


Epipactis specimen 33i - 
Photo: Hutton Roof on 15th June 2020




Although the above plant (33i) may look large in this photo it is only about 10" tall. 
I don't feel too confident on our Pallens No.7 (Rich Mielcarek). I noticed it had somehow got caught up in the grass, and although I removed the grass to free it, was rather limp and showed slight indentation on the stem. It got a bonus drink and was straightened out for now, so it really is fingers crossed this year. Below a photo to show you how it looked today.



This photo gives you an idea of the pallid differences from a nearby classic atrorubens



From the 55s (above), usually a nice specimen, but this year looks like everything has gone into the leaves.



(above) is a very light specimen and called 55m and today it is about 6" high.


Moving on to the Pallens 4,4a,5 and 5a.
The only one which has come through as yet is Pallens 4 the toughest and most established of the four. 
Brown Hare has been a problem yet again and now also took down 69 and 69a (both considered to be hybrids), also some 17s gone missing. 



Epipactis atrorubens Pallens 4
Photo: Hutton Roof 15th June 2020


A nice helleborine in the 15s area
Photo: Hutton Roof on 15th June 2020



(above) not shown for the past two years and now Escarp 12 is coming through, but which one is it?





This is the most beautiful Escarp 13 which is one of the robust bicolors, but sadly the plant has already subdued plenty of nibbling etc, but checking it through it seems to have come through it and over the next two weeks we will get a better picture.




(above) is the beautiful "Lutescens" or Pallens 3
It is really great to see it doing well



(above) is a light specimen from the 9s population.
A area full of light specimens and hybrids.

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Tuesday 9th June 2020

I would guess that the first atroruben flowers will be showing in about 10 days time.

It was a rather mixed picture today. Lots of the plants are doing fine and look great, but there are such a lot of small "stumpy" plants coming through as well.

Quite a lot (of no-necks) are coming through with a direct vertical inflorescence from the word go and I will show examples of this in the photos below.  This looks particularly strange on small 3" plants that show a budded inflorescence and yet pointing up to the sky, without first going through the head bent over before straightening process which we are used to. This is certainly not regular in the quantities I am seeing it, and can only presume it has something to do with the historic and more recent dry weather we have had. 

Here (below) is a strange looking plant which seemed to be all bract and nothing showing in the way of buds


Epipactis atrorubens
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens from the 17s population
showing signs of leaf shrinking
Hutton Roof 9th June 2020
(Please click over image to enlarge)


Epipactis atrorubens - 9s population
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2020

Epipactis atrorubens - 9s population
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2020

Another point of special interest for me today, was to notice just how well formed and advanced the Epipactis helleborine were and this is how it is in most years by now.


Epipactis schmalhauseneii 33 and E. atrorubens bicolor 33a and 33b

All doing well and several new plants belonging to the 33 population are coming through.  This next one is new and looking at it so far presuming it will be one of the less vigorous hybrids, but obviously will know better in another fortnight.


 possible Epipactis schmalhauseneii 33i - low vigour
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2020


possible Epipactis schmalhauseneii 33i - low vigour
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2020


Epipactis atrorubens - bicolor
Hutton Roof - 9th June 2020

This is a very special plant E.atrorubens bicolor Specimen 66, which usually comes through on a light green stem and cream coloured epichile and bosses.


Epipactis atrorubens bicolor specimen 55
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2020

This is the very rare 55 which has re-appeared after a absence of one year and is doing well.


Epipactis atrorubens var Pallens No.4 and 4a
Hutton Roof on 9th June 2020

Above you see two pallens, the large one at the back is Specimen 4 (established 3 years) and showing well, but a little more worrying is 4a which is about a third back from the front of the photo.  This small specimen does not seem to have progressed in over one week.


Epipactis atrorubens Pallens 5a
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2020

After a further check specimen 5 has not come through this time and looking at the strange looking 5a (above), I am not sure how this is going to turn out.


Epipactis atrorubens bicolor specimen 40,40a
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2020 

This (above) is the best it has looked for about 3 years, a very special bicolor specimen with a strong purple stem.



Above is 15c and a new 15d growing alongside


A nice nearby E. Helleborine which is always a good specimen and is now about
12", but tends to suffer greatly because it does not have canopy and fully exposed

Another point of special interest for me today, was to notice just how well formed and advanced the Epipactis helleborine were and this is how it is in most years by now.

I particularly checked out the E. helleborine which always comes up next to the "Westmorlandii" and yes the helleborine was there at about 4".  So I then felt it necessary to check all around the hazel tree to see if I could find anything and nothing is showing as yet.

But the interesting thing is, it probably goes a long way to support the fact that the Westmorlandii plant is phyllanthes, because if the Westmorlandii was an aberrant E. helleborine it would or should be showing something by now in line with all the other helleborines. Our Westmorlandii never appears before mid July which is yet another factor in the support of phyllanthes.



(Above) A very very pleasant surprise today to note that Escarp 11 and 12 (both hybrids)
have eventually come through. Both these
two are deep colour (hyperchromic) look.


(above) This is Escarp 12 which has just started to show after being missing for
two years on account of the drought



 (above) Escarp 7 and 7a - Epipactis atrorubens




Well this is the most beautiful Escarp 13 (bicolor) which is usually one of the
two most striking of bicolors.  I thought last week we had lost him with rodents
keep having a bash, but he seems to have overcome and is on the mend.


Escarp 8 which is a superb bicolor specimenand today I will call him "No Neck"




The photos above show the rare Lutescens (Pallens 3) coming through well this year. Its been missing the past two years because of the 2018 drought and undermining the roostock with ants which live under the close by brown stone you can see in the photo.



Nice Escarp classic atrorubens, showing the differences in inflorescence this year eg: left is normal and to the right is "No Neck" which is not regular.



Above is Specimen 17d (or PMG)


Here is one of our best hybrids 17K which has been taken down


Above: This is brilliant news to note that 70 and 70a are eventually coming through and so I know we are in for a treat.


Another hybrid showing their faces is Specimen 69 and 69a.
Its a good little area with several surrounding E. Helleborines like the ones you see in the next photo.


Two beautiful Helleborines coming through within a metre of hybrid Specimen 69 and 69a (9th June 2020)





Our No.2 victim this year has arrived with 11a one of our best hybrids having been nibbled off! (9th June 2020)



This is 9a (or Pallens No.2) which I thought we had lost this year, but eventually it is coming through


This is Schmal No.11 which has been coming through now for at least 6 years and seems to be doing OK, but surprised to see its mate within a few inches away has already been nibbled off yet they have left this one. 



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Saturday 30th May 2020

I checked out my study patch today and was very pleased with the way most of the orchids were progressing, however at the same time rather disappointed at the many losses we seem to be getting this year.

I can't recall ever being in such a position were we have lost so many of our prized orchids. I am absolutely sure this will be down to long term issues resulting from the 2018 drought, which ever since the event has been responsible for premature die-back and stunted plants in that same year and the following year. And now looking at all the strong plants gone missing this year (2020).  

For example:
33G (bicolor), Pallens 5, 15a (hybrid) 15b (hybrid), 74 (bicolor), Escarp 11 (hybrid), Escarp 12 (hybrid), 17 (hybrid), 17n (hybrid?), 17p (hybrid?), 70 (hybrid), 70a (hybrid), 9 or Pallens 2, (Total of 13 special plants gone for now!) 

Special prominent plants that have come back with us this year after being absent for one or more years include:

55 (bicolor), 15c (hybrid), Escarp 8 (Pallen/Lutescens) Total of 3 special plants returned with us after absence. 

I am now convinced that the problems in the main have been due to long term effects still with us from the 2018 drought.  Yet now it is possible that they may be compounded with this follow up dry weather we are experiencing during May/early June 2020. So lets hope we get plenty of rain over the coming week or two. 

I started off checking out some Fly Orchids. One lies immediately under the Juniper bush, this one is OK but certainly much smaller than usual, it has flowered but the plant is only about 3". I did find one other in the shallow grykes, but two have gone missing this year.



Above) This was a nice atrorubens specimen quite close to the Juniper near the - Fly Orchids





The above photos show a lovely strong atroruben specimen up by the initial "Helleborine" start area.
Moving on to the 33 Population - a excellent bicolor specimen has not come through from the rear of the hazel bush (see photo below).



I need to map out, each time I take photos and make notes or I will forget what relates to what. This is the 33 population showing the main players 33,33a,33b and the two small lined areas indicate the small schmals (not vigorous, in fact quite the opposite) 



This photo shows the 33 population area with Schmal 33 in the cage on the right hand, and bicolors 33b and 33c in the cage to the bottom left hand of the hazel tree. The smaller cage to the LH holds a small less vigorous Schmal.



Above is Schmal 33 (uncaged) a lovely
hybrid which usually shows a white/cream epichile and bosses.



The above are Specimen 33b and 33c which are both fine examples of Atrorubens - bicolor



This specimen from the 33 population is thought to be a hybrid of the less vigour club.  It is a little beauty of no more than 10" and grows at about 8ft in a NW of Schmal 33.

Now we are moving on to the next populations which are 55 and 66 (both predominately strong atroruben bicolors



This plant is a long term favourite and quite unique. The plant is coming through well and seems happy placed next to its comrade the Juniper bush. I have in the past used this particular plant to demonstrate one angle of the "bicolor" variety, showing the rare added feature of it being on a light green stem together with epichile and bosses of a cream colour



This is showing the area were Specimen bicolor 66 resides quite close to its Juniper neighbour.



(above) Still with the 55 populations we have our Pallens specimen 7 (or Rich M)



above is a beautiful bicolor specimen which resides within a metre of (Rich M)



This is a very special atrorubens bicolor (55) which was found damaged in 2018 having been trampled or rotted from the roostock and then never came through during 2019. So to see this one in 2020 is great news. It is one of the two finest of our "bicolor" varieties. In the past it has been 20" high and bearing 40 flowers.




This shows the special little plant named specimen 55L which is on its own and grows to about 10" high and is a little beauty of a bicolor variety with the light epichile/boss feature which you can sometimes associate with the bicolor. 




Above are more from the 55s population.



Above: Shows a close up of the 55s population area



Now moving on across to our No 4 (top photos) and No 4a (bottom photos) Pallens
both seem to be doing OK....

Moving further across to check out No.5 and No.5a.  Sadly No.5 looks to be absent, although I am keeping my eye on a miniscule growth starting up, so all may not be lost as yet.  But (below) is showing No.5b



above: shows our beautiful 5a Pallens and alongside we have got the following duo (new this year)



Moving over, does anyone remember our variagated (humbug) E. Helleborine, well its come through again this year, but like last year very untidy and sprawled out (all in the leaf), whether it will do anything, I doubt it!






Here above are the pair of 40s coming through and showing the rare bicolor variety when mature. It's great to see these two, they have had it difficult in the last 3 years, twice having been grazed off by Brown Hare, and suffered in 2018 and again in 2019 with premature die-back half way through growing on account of drought weathers.

Next on I have reached a very prolific area with the 15s population. It's great to see that 15c has come through after a very turbulent history having been grazed off and drought attack, so two years on and its looking good, but it will need water very soon. 



Top left is how it looked yesterday (30th May) whilst the other photos are from 2017



Above - shows 15c at the forefront and gives you a idea of the immediate vicinity

Now some very sad news and that is that our special vigour hybrids specimen 15 and 15a have not come through this year.  Every year they struggle with Mr. Brown Hare grazing them off.  Here is a photo of how they have looked in years past.



Above: 15 and 15a in past years.

Now moving on and checking out Specimen 74 which was a bicolor and had a very light epichile and bosses which is regular with some of these bicolor varieties.  It's yet another one thats missing this year.  Again it has had a very turbulent couple of years with the drought in 2018 and followed by stunted growth in 2019.

Escarp 10 and 10a are doing fine, but Escarp 12 is missing now for it's 3rd year on the run, and this year also its neighbour 12a is also gone missing. 

Escarp 13 my special bicolor has again been attacked by something at the rootstock and I can just about see some green activity down in the bottom, so whether it can recover I will have to wait and see. In the meantime this plant gets a free drink of water.....

Some really good news (so far) is that Escarp 8 the rare Lutescens is coming through, although the ant infestation is still present and next to the orchid (under the brown stone in the photo). This is really good news because again the orchid has been missing in 2018 and 2019. Here is the latest photo below.

 

Moving right across the pavements now to the 17s population.




This is a cracking plant as you can see from the photo.  It is 17d (or PMG) and started off as a trio, but two years ago reverted down to a single plant.  Another with a very light epichile and bosses.



Another showing 17d or PMG with protection. Some of these special plants need it!



Schmal 17k always shows well and is tucked away by the side of a large boulder and surrounded by Limestone Fern



This one is 17v which is a superb bicolor

and resides close to a hazel tree and 
near to the previous 17k


Sadly I have noticed this year that Specimen No.17 is not showing at all. This was a beauty with a very light green stem and lovely flowers, see above for past photo.

Another of our special orchids has also not come through this year after a 4 year run is Specimen 70. Also Specimen 70a which started to show about two years ago has also gone missing.
Here is a photo below showing Specimen 70 (top photo) and beneath shows both 70 and 70a which are now both missing.








Pallens 9 - A very palid specimen but doing OK


The beautiful 9b is very special and coming along nicely

Schmal No.9 been attacked by rodent 



Last years branched atrorubens specimen, I wonder if
it will have gone back to normal this year?

*******

Wednesday 27th May 2020

This is Schmalhuaseneii No.1 which I found back in 2012 and resides in Lancelot Clark Storth (CWT). It looks a little bit bedraggled and certainly "thirsty". Well it got lucky! and received 1/3rd of my water bottle.....

I was well happy to see it (8 years on) because last year (2019) it never even showed and I thought perhaps we had lost it because of the 2018 draught, but these Hutton Roof hybrids are battlers!






Wednesday 20th May 2020


Very bright sunny day (warmest day of the year so far).
Its becoming obvious that the more vigorous specimens shown in the following photographs are in the main from hybrid, or robust bicolor specimens.

  Epipactis helleborine build usually come through first followed by the more robust forms of hybrids or Epipactis atrorubens 

The 33 population are doing fine, also pleased to see 55 is coming through this year (the tall bicolor) which having previously gone down a couple of years ago makes its return.

Pallens 4,4a,5,5a and 7 not yet showing. It's always the case that pallens varieties for some reason come through a little later than most.

15,15a,15c Schmals are all on their way but I must make sure to close the top of their cage because you know who has learnt to lean his head over to nibble off.

Our only Lutescens escarp 8 is as yet not showing, but this again is also late very similar to Pallens, also again ant infestation at roostock.

Bicolor just 20ft w of Lutescens coming through OK.

17s populations are generally doing OK and will make further obs this next week. 

9s populations doing OK, will put cages back in place over the coming weeks.

The branched epipactis specimen is coming through again, we will have to wait to see just how it turns out this year.

No signs yet and far too early for the "westmorlandii" but have if closely monitored.

A couple of Helleborines at first approach
Photo: 20th May 2020 Hutton Roof

 atrorubens (my first of the year) whilst on approach and next to Juniper
Photo: 20th May 2020

Nos 33b and 33c Atrorubens - bicolor
Photo: 20th May 2020 Hutton Roof

 This one I do remember it being a small (small in 2019) with very light features
and within a metre or so of 40a,40b.

 This one I do remember it being a small (small in 2019) with very light features
and within a metre or so of 40a,40b.


This just is a welcome surprise (on the left), its 15c (schmalhauseneii) which had over 60 plus flowers back in 2017 (photo on right) which was taken down by Brown Hare, Moving on and in 2018 it came through stunted
and early die-back because of the drought weather and sadly in 2019 it never even came through at all, so today is fabulous news. 


 This is one of the helleborines close to the 15s population
and would represent the average size of  most of the helleborines
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof

 A classic atrorubens named Escarp 7
Its another beauty from this particular population, 
I am sure it will get its spectacular colour on account of its canopy
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof

 Atrorubens - Bicolor
One of our strongest "bicolor" plants which is 20 yards away from our one and only Lutescens
Doing well - Photo 20th May 2020



Classic atrorubens on escarpment
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof

Another close-by atrorubens
on escarp 20th May 2020

 The above is the start of 17c (or PMG)
It started off with 3 separate grouped plants back in , but in 2017, but down to a double
by 2018 and down to a single by 2019.  I will post a photo of how it looked when it was
the trio (next photo)


This photo gives you some idea of how it looked as a trio.
Although today it is singular, it is very special in its make-up
Of a light form but not classed as a Pallens, yet lots of light features
these photos are from 2017


A fine classic atrorubens coming through in the 17 populations
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof

This is Schmalhauseneii (hybrid) No. 17k
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof


Here we have a nice pair of E. Helleborines
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof



This is the small atrorubens with a lovely cream coloured epichile and boss
for the past 7 years
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof 


This is Schmal No. 9obviously been gnawed by some rodent
Photo: 20th May 2020 - Hutton Roof


 
This is a beauty from the 9s populations