Monday, 26 December 2016

Identification from physical features of the "Hutton Roof" Schmalhauseneii



Identification from shape of Leaves, spiralling of leaves up the stem and the colour of the stem 


(above) A probable hybrid Schmalhauseneii
Photo taken of 46 on 26th July 2015
A good example by size and shape of leaves together with
spiralling the stem
this is probably a first generation, although quite a lot of the
hybrids are just small feeble looking things (not all vigour!)


No.15 in 2016 strong but leaves always looked very dry and "creasy" and losing
 that beautiful keeled example which you could see back in the 2014 specimens, however excellent example of leaf spiralling.
 No.15a which grows alongside 15 just remained a stump and never progressed (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Bryan Yorke 21st July 2016


First time for a few years Specimen Schmalhauseneii No. 17k has been able to flower without actually being predated prior to flowering. This is a first generation and shows another good example of leaf spiralling.
Photo: 11th July 2019 - Hutton Roof



Epipactis helleborine - showing spiral leafing
One of the best examples to show helleborine shaped leaves

and obvious helleborine spiralling up the green stem. Now check
out below on the hybrid spiralling and how similar!


Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
A good showing of typical hybrid leaf spiralling on a atrorubens led hybrid
plant. Note the similarities with the HELLEBORINE in the above photo


First time for a few years Specimen Schmalhauseneii No. 17k has been able to flower without actually being predated prior to flowering. This is a first generation and shows another good example of leaf spiralling.
Photo: 11th July 2019 - Hutton Roof

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 8th July 2019
This photo shows a more close up of the spiralling

This photo is taken from a strong 1st generation hybrid (see above photo eg: specimen 17k) (Epipactis schmalhauseneii) and clearly shows the large leaves (eg: helleborine introgression) and also the spiralling leaves up the stem (eg: even more helleborine introgression) and the very light green stem (please note: not so much green or dark green or even purple although these are also valid) this again is helleborine introgression. You will note in the above photo that the lowest parts of the stem remains purple and this would be expected in a typical schmalhauseneii hybrid, maintaining in part it's atroruben influence.   So just in that small description we have managed to highlight at least three pointers in regards to identification of a schmalhauseneii.

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 8th July 2019
from the 55 populations
This photo shows a more close up of the spiralling in a
later generation plant. 

****

Possible identification from 'bunched inflorescence' or flowers going to all sides of the stem

This bunched head (overladen spike) is seen in perhaps 25% of schmalhauseneii specimens (but perhaps not just as vigorous as the one in the next photo), were the flowers go all around the stem, rather than to two sides of the stem which you see in regular atrorubens, again this is another sign of Helleborine introgression, check out these photos:

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 8th July 2019
Please note this is NOT a light green stem but a purple/dark green stem


Shows bunched effect of flowers going all around the stem
You may think the leaves are atrorubens and you would be right (although maybe excessive in size here for atrorubens and again probably shows helleborine introgression), so you cannot depend all the time on spiralling large leaves, but this is how it goes with hybrids, they are dependent on what and how they are picking up their features from the respective parents and their histories, although let me say that the spiralling leaves are now present in successive years on this particular specimen.  These specimen 15s (shown above and below) are very vigorous plants and of first generation.  A couple of years ago and lying at a distance of only 10 yards from the above plant I had the following plant which had 62 flowers or buds, I am sure from the make-up and profile of the plant it came through as a direct decendant from the 15s population (shown above).

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 2017
Specimen 15c had 62 buds or flowers
Please note this is NOT a light green stem but a purple stem

Epipactis schmalhauseneii (hybrid) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 2017
Specimen 8

Another specimen above which shows flowers going all around the stem

*****
Another great supportive aid for identification can be by using leaf edge "denticulation"...........

I have been very fortunate over the years to have had the privilege of a further aide to help me with supportive evidence in identification and that's been from previous work already carried out by both Sean Cole and also by Mike Wilcox in their own individual studies. 



The first photo I show will be the regular "Atrorubens" which here you can see in colour, 


40x Denticulation photo of "atrorubens" used as a supportive aid to identification (photo: Sean Cole)

With atrorubens you can see the teeth pattern are pretty regular and not only that they do bear a double layer of teeth if you look very close. It is also clear that you can see a line of "purple" colour showing to the bottom of the teeth (this of course is the "Red" trade mark which you should note is not seen on the following helleborine photo.  



So this next photo is the Epipactis Helleborine denticulation photo:


A x40 denticulation photo of E. Helleborine kindly shared by Sean Cole


With E. Helleborine which you can see in the above photo the teeth pattern is much more uneven with odd individual teeth or even small cluster rows appearing amidst a more regular section etc.  Also you do not usually see the line of "purple" which is associated more with the atrorubens. You tend to associate the denticulation with transparency!



And finally I want to show a photo of what maybe a Schmalhauseneii hybrid and again a photo to help me in a supportive roll of trying to obtain identification.



x40 denticulation of  possible E. Schmallhausenii.  Photo kindly shared by Sean Cole


And finally from the photo above you will see that it represents a more or less "in between of the previous two photos.  The teeth are irregular but will get more regular rows in between the protruding teeth like we had with the atrorubens.  Also if you do look very close again you should see a double row of teeth.  Also sometimes but very rarely on the hybrid you can see a trace of purple colour at the bottom of the teeth (in 90% of cases they will be transparent like you get in E. Helleborine).




I am also very fortunate to have the following photos from Mike Wilcox which also show "denticulation (teeth patterns on leaf edges)" features:






This is yet another examble of "denticulation" of the E. Helleborine (Photo: Mike Wilcox)



Basal leaf structure in E. Schmalhauseneii showing the red/purple staining.
also see another example below, but this time on green (helleborine) influenced stem.
from my diaries 21st July 2014
(please click over the photo to enlarge)


This is a photo of a "green stemmed" = Helleborine parent introgression, with
the obvious signs of atrorubens creeping in with the red/purple sheath to stem,
purple vertical lines, together with purple base and again the trailing
 edge to basal.
from my diaries 21st July 2014
(please click over photo to enlarge)